ONE BLOCK FROM THE WHITE HOUSE – LEAKER IDENTIFIED AND CAUGHT ON VIDEO

ONE BLOCK FROM THE WHITE HOUSE – LEAKER IDENTIFIED AND CAUGHT ON VIDEO

Washington DC, USA, November 2017, In order to detect possible leakage and evaluate the general pipeline condition, the District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority, DC Water, decided to optically and acoustically inspect one of the oldest parts of the Washington DC’s drinking water network. A 670m (2,200ft) section of a cement mortar lined cast iron main – installed in 1888 – was subject to be investigated by MTA Pipe-Inspector® multisensory technology.

DC Water’s oldest cast iron pipe still in service was installed in 1858, just as its population was achieving 75,000 residents. These pipes were primarily used for public hydrants as fire protection. Over 160 years, these pipes are now connected to the entire system supplying treated drinking water as well as fire water. The average age of DC Water’s underground water supply pipes is almost 80 years, with over 480km (300 miles) of its 2,100km (1,300 miles) over 100 years old. On average, 400 to 500 water main breaks occur each year in the city, mostly during the winter. As the mains age, the number of leaks in the system increases.

CABLE-LESS MULTISENSOR INSPECTION

Joint leaks, a major cause of DC Water’s revenue loss on older mains, are difficult to locate because many of the city’s water mains have been laid under streets surrounded by numerous other underground utilities. In this situation leaks do not easily surface and instead follow along any underground pipe until the water reaches a wastewater sewer, electrical vault, or some other easy point of escape. Unidentified leaks represent a significant portion of the 20% of the water that never reaches a customer meter.

DC Water addresses this problem of underground leaks …

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